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Concurrent Programs

JCLC 2022 Concurrent Programs with Descriptions & Presenters

 

Concurrent Sessions 1: Thursday, October 6th – 10:30 – 11:45AM

Increasing diversity in the library by accepting international visiting scholars: a case study of Central Washington University

Palm Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Ping Fu, Central Washington University

This presentation will review the best practice of the Visiting Scholars Initiative at the Central Washington University Libraries, and present benefits and outcomes, particularly from the perspectives of increasing diversity in the library, collaborating with the International Office and other academic units on campus, and promoting international exchange between institutions and scholars.

 

Libros for Oregon: Connecting Libraries With the Guadalajara Book Fair, a Cooperative Buying Approach

Palm Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Star Khan, Libros for Oregon

 

Libros for Oregon (LfO) has established a cooperative buying process that provides Oregon libraries with greater access to the materials of the Guadalajara Book Fair (FIL), the largest Spanish-language book fair in the world. This effort has increased the quality and authenticity of library collections across Oregon at a very affordable rate. Learn how this process has been crafted and how you can replicate LfO’s methods in your own area!

 

Promoting Diversity in Faculty Hiring: One Case at a Community College and Lessons to Be Drawn

Palm Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Michael Habata, Los Angeles Pierce College

How can diversity in the demographics of college faculty be increased? This presentation will examine the process of creating a training workshop to promote diversity in faculty hiring at a community college in southern California and the ongoing effort to make attendance of the workshop mandatory in order to serve on a faculty hiring committee. A small group exercise will examine the difficulty in agreeing on what makes a suitable candidate for a hiring committee, and ideas for the workshop and best practices in how to develop and promote the training will be shared.

 

Turning Barriers into Bridging Opportunities: Exploring How Librarians of Color Can Provide Unique Services for International Patrons in Academic Libraries

Palm Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Yali Feng, University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Both international patrons (IP) and LOC face barriers in current library systems. Operating from a strengths perspective and taking an empathetic strategy, this project will share how LOC can use their unique experiences to find common ground in interacting with IP. This approach centers on providing culturally sensitive services for IP, which builds trust and access and in turn contributes to the library’s EDI service landscape. Barriers can be turned into bridging opportunities, as librarians share their own experiences and empathize with patrons. Case examples from practice will be shared.

 

Beyond Who Was?: Choosing, Promoting, and Using Engaging Biographies for Pre-school to Elementary Students

Citrus Room

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Workshop) 

Speakers: Tara Thomas, Hutchison School

 

During this workshop, participants will be given tools to evaluate their biography collection for books that are engaging and represent people of diverse cultures. Resources for finding engaging biographies will be shared. The use of biographies to teach text features will be explored and other lesson ideas will be addressed. Opportunities to engage with texts and other forms of media using biographies will be given. Also, ideas for using biographies as a catalyst for discussions and lessons and projects for use in the library and in collaboration with others will be offered.

 

A Place at the Table: The Jewish Community Within the Library Diversity World

Glades Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Heidi Rabinowitz, Association of Jewish Libraries

 

The FBI reports that 60% of all religious hate crimes in the US target Jews despite the fact that only 2% of America’s population identifies as Jewish. Heidi Rabinowitz, synagogue library director, past president of the Association of Jewish Libraries, Judaic kidlit advocate and podcaster, will address this issue and discuss why/how the Jewish community belongs under the library world’s diversity umbrella. She will dispel myths about Jews and Jewish literature, define opportunities for inclusion, and suggest goals for allyship.

 

Half an Eulogy for the LORDS Work

Glades Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Jaime Ding, Tisch Library / Tufts University

 

The LibGuides Open Review Discussion Sessions, a project started within the California State University Libraries, will be demonstrated and discussed. The LORDS project facilitated conversations about the politics of citations in LibGuides, including professionalization, inclusion, and transparency. It utilized critical race theory to acknowledge structures of publishing, libraries, and reference, yet implementing this open review system was a constant battle against ego, dismissiveness, and fear of the idea of “race.” While much potential has died, the work has not stopped.

 

Not All Responses are Equal: Analyzing Public Libraries’ Statements on Anti-Asian Violence

Glades Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Andrew Chae, San Jose State University

 

Throughout the pandemic, discriminatory rhetoric and acts of violence have caused many Asian Americans to live with a sense of anxiety and fear. As advocates for social justice, public libraries have an important role to play in fighting against anti-Asian hate. This presentation will look at the response statements that public libraries have released in support of Asian communities. The information that libraries chose to include and omit will be analyzed. In addition, the presentation will cover potential ways libraries can create and use response statements to maximize their impact.

 

 

Supporting Student Unity and Agency in Asian-identified students after the “China virus”

Glades Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Nancy  Schuler, Eckerd College

 

Being a librarian of color at a predominantly white institution gives you insight into the experiences of students of color and the support they may or may not receive. After attempts to create a student-led club for Asian-identified students on campus failed, success was finally found in the aftermath of the “China virus” when hate crimes against the AAPI community grew. This lightning talk shares ideas for how librarians of color can support underrepresented students through student clubs to promote DEIB efforts on campus and help create community so students really feel like they belong.

 

 

 

Studying the Retention of Mid-Career BIPOC Librarians in the U.S. and Canada: Reflections on Collaborative Research Processes and Preliminary Findings

Sawyer Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers: Maha Kumaran, University of Saskatchewan

Tarida  Anantachai, North Carolina State University

Ye Li, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Rebecca Martin, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Cecilia Tellis, University of Ottawa

 

The session will provide an overview of a research study examining the personal retention practices of librarians who participated in ARL’s Leadership and Career Development Program, a leadership program intended for mid-career BIPOC librarians. The presenters, BIPOC librarians from Canada and the U.S., will provide insights on the process of and strategies for conducting ethnographic studies across multiple institutions and borders, and the unique considerations that BIPOC researchers face in such studies. In doing so, they will also discuss their preliminary findings to frame the discussion.

 

 

 

 

Demystifying Academic Librarianship: Making Academic Libraries More Accessible to Diverse Applicants

Sabal Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Kaiya Schroeder, Auraria Library

 

While there has been much discussion of the need to recruit and retain a diverse library workforce, academic libraries present an institutional context in which such initiatives are complicated by the norms of academia and often rendered opaque to outsiders. In this session, presenters will discuss the current state of diversity in academic libraries, factors influencing potential applicants as they consider their employment options, and what actions academic libraries and library schools can take to disrupt the current divide between academic libraries and potential applicants.

 

Spilling the T(ruth) on Management – Lessons Learned from Public & Academic Librarians

Sabal Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Tammy Mays, Milwaukee Public Library

In this interactive session, Dr. Tammy Mays, Stephanie M. Harris, and Hermoine Bell-Henderson will share management lessons learned over their journey through various management levels in public and academic libraries. The presenters will discuss general management strategies through the lens of Emotional Intelligence. They will also discuss managing staff on the frontlines, managing through change, managing former colleagues, and co-managing a team and operations while overcoming imposter syndrome.

 

 

 

Partnership-Driven Progress: Social Justice Programming in Public Libraries

Sawgrass Room

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Workshop)

Speakers:

Nicholas Brown, Prince George’s County Memorial Library System

Michelle Hamiel, Prince George’s County Memorial Library System

 

The Prince George’s County Memorial Library System and Office of Human Rights model for collaborative public library programming offers best practices to public library workers who wish to expand their organization’s capacity for offering social justice-focused programs that have a high potential for social impact with extremely limited financial resources. Panelists discuss their collaborative programming lifecycle that continually creates new opportunities for engaging new audiences and affects community-wide progress one viewer at a time.

 

 

 

Researching Library Leadership Development Programs for BIPOC Populations

Long Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers: Mark Puente, Purdue University Libraries

In 2021, the Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies was awarded an IMLS Research in the Service to Practice grant (RE-251099-OLS-21) to study leadership development programs for library employees who identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). This presentation will provide a status update on this four-stage research project that will produce an analysis of historical efforts, collect data on perceived effects of training on past participants, and provide recommendations for the future of programs to ensure continued improvement and efficacy.

 

 

Developing BIPOC Leaders, creating a space to build self-awareness and community through personal reflection, writing, and interpersonal communication in collaboration with key community leaders.

Banyan Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Workshop)  

Speakers:

Ana Ruiz Morillo, Multnomah County Library

Lucy Iraola, Multnomah County Library

Joaquin Lopez, Affectus Counseling

 

Libraries are in a position to build community capacity to advance knowledge, understanding, and empowerment. To this end, libraries are community anchors, playing a key role in developing peaceful and sustainable communities. Through this leadership program, BIPOC communities had a space to foster and build connection, to identify and voice common concerns, and to grow self-awareness through reading, dialog, writing, and creative expression. Multnomah County Library provided this program in partnership with Joaquin Lopez, MS, NCC, currently a Creative Laureate for the City of Portland

 

 

Okay Library Systems, Real Talk! Let’s Just BE About It

Jasmine Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration (Workshop) 

Jenaya Myvett, Saint Paul Public Library

 

Saint Paul Public Library (SPPL), MN has a small team of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) library staff members that work across 13 branches. Community specialists define themselves as bridges, connectors, anchors, and advocates for their community. They build relationships and make community connections to valuable services, both within and outside of SPPL. This panel and interactive workshop will provide attendees with an opportunity to learn about the work of Community Specialists followed by discussion and creation of ideas that can be applied in their own library settings.

 

 

Library Preparedness: Formalizing and Supporting the Diversity Residency Experience Using a Resident Centered Framework (RCF)

Bird Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers: Maya Bergamasco, Harvard Law School Library

Mallary Rawls, Florida State University

Laura Tadena, Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Kalani Adolpho, University of Miami Libraries

 

In this session, the presenters will discuss the approach behind the Diversity Residency Toolkit, which addresses the gap between perceived institutional support and actual support received in diversity residency positions. Our approach is rooted in our personal experiences as former/current resident librarians as well as the body of research on diversity residencies, both of which informed the creation of a Resident Centered Framework (RCF). We argue that RCF-based practices like institutional implementation of the Toolkit are key factors to the retention of diverse library professionals.

 

 

 

Concurrent Sessions 2: Thursday, October 6th – 2:00 – 3:15PM

 

 

LibVoices: Amplifying the Experiences and Privileging the Perspectives of BIPOC Library Workers

 

Sawyer Key Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Panel)

Speakers:

Jamillah R.  Gabriel, Harvard University

Jamia  Williams, SUNY Brockport

 

This session will provide a brief overview of the creation of the podcast and offer tips for starting a podcast, followed by an exploration of the prominent themes and lessons emerging from the dozens of interviews conducted with BIPOC library workers over the past three years.

 

 

The reluctant leader: Conquering stereotypes, imposter syndrome and rising to new heights

 

Tarpon Key Room

Track:Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Lessa  Pelayo-Lozada, Palos Verdes Library District

Alanna Aiko  Moore, UC San Diego

 

Sandy  Wee, San Mateo County Libraries

 

Stereotypes of gender, race, and culture often prevent AAPI women from rising to positions of leadership. Panelists will explore the role of their upbringing as AAPI women, their intersectional identities, and their reluctance of, and eventual taking on of leadership roles. Insight and advice will be offered to other hesitant leaders and/or those who may not see themselves as leaders at all. The panel will include interactive elements through polling and sharing of attendees’ own experiences with leadership (and reluctance).

 

 

Black Film: A Gateway to Community Engagement

 

Palm Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Angel  Truesdale, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Learn about how a large urban public library creates programs centered around Black film. After each film, the audience was able to engage through a facilitated conversation, often moderated by a community member. After building an audience and planners even sought feedback from the community to determine future events. Eventually, the film series involved having community members act as co-programmers and began a process to break through a reluctant community to engage with entertainment, education, and creativity.

 

How Wide is Your Window? A Thoughtful Approach to EDI Family Programming

Palm Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Carolyn Valencia, High Plains Library District

This presentation will discuss EDI programming for families through High Plains Library District’s first Family Book Club, Widening the Window. In partnership with Greeley-Evans School District Six, this four-month series encompasses the idea of generational radicalized trauma while exploring various healing techniques for all family members. Attendees will leave with valuable tools: • How to request grant funding • How to incorporate goals, outputs, and outcomes • Three themed storytime planners • Easy somatic exercises to metabolize strong emotions • Incorporating community partners

 

“Do You See Me?”: The Lack of Representation of Diverse Skin Tones in Medical Education

Palm Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:
Katresa  Gardner, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Persko (PJ) Grier, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic

Stacie  Fairley, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Valerie  Cadet, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

Racial Inequality and discrimination continue to be a persistent problem in healthcare. Research shows a significant lack of representation of diverse skin tone images in medical textbooks, journals, and digital media. Though a few resources exist within certain specialties that represent non-white patient images useful for medical education, few are illustrated in microbiology, pathology, immunology, and anatomy resources. Given this lack of diversity, health care providers may find it challenging to identify various disease presentations in non-white patients.

 

 

 

 

Full circle moment: from ACE Scholars to LIS leaders – Gathering for Action!

Long Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Gerald  Holmes University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Clara  Chu University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Ingrid  Ruffin University of Nevada at Las Vegas

Shali  Zhang Auburn University Libraries

Martha  Anderson University of Arkansas Libraries

 

 

Candidates from historically and purposefully marginalized identities bring with them not only their professional and educational expertise, but also the expertise of their lived experiences. One of the many questions this panel will answer is how can organizations change and grow to serve as fertile ground for future and present leaders in the profession? We will answer critical questions while sharing information and lessons learned from the ACE (Academic and Cultural Enhancement/IMLS Grant Sponsored Program) at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

 

 

 

 

BIPOC Book Publishing: Pitfalls, Protocols, & Proclivities

 

Concurrent Session 2: Bird Key Room – Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)  

Speakers: Yago Cura, HINCHAS Press

 

White is not the default when it comes to book publishing. More and more, readers, librarians, and administrators understand the importance of diversity and inclusion, but publishers are either too slow to adapt or indifferent. Participants will leave our panel discussion with an orientation on starting their own publishing press, which will include a sincere and earnest discussion about finances, time, and effort; in addition, this session will lend participants guidance for picking the right designer, printer, and distributor, as well as offer anecdotes for attracting and promoting audiences

 

 

 

Gathering for Action: Insights from Outreach to Understand and Respond to the Health Information Needs of Black Americans

 

Citrus Room

Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration (Roundtable)

Speakers: Bethany McGowan, Purdue University

 

In this session, we will review how findings from a qualitative systematic review were used to develop a service-learning course that connects undergraduate researchers with local grassroots community organizers to design sustainable health information literacy interventions that build community trust and improve information-seeking behavior in African American communities. We will discuss the benefits and limitations of qualitative systematic reviews as a means to gather evidence and service-learning as a pedagogy to engage students and librarians in their local communities.

 

 

 

 

¡Bienvenidos a la Lectura! (Welcome to Reading): Selecting and Leveling Culturally Specific Books for Spanish-Speaking Beginning Readers

 

Glades Room

Tracks: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

Speakers:

Delia  Palomeque, Multnomah County Library

Stephanie  Orellana, Multnomah County Library

Patricia  Morán, Multnomah County Library

Kimberly  Servera, Multnomah County Library

 

Multnomah County Library staff present the Bienvenidos a la Lectura (Welcome to Reading) collection and their path from advocacy to developing circulating collections.

 

 

 

Building relationships with under represented communities through community engagement and Special Collections

 

Jasmine Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Roundtable)

Speakers:

Shahadah  Abdul-Rashid, Free Library of Philadelphia

 

Veronica  Britto, Free Library of Philadelphia

 

The collection of over 1,000 Islamic manuscripts already housed by the Free Library, served as a method of engagement with the Islamic community and helped to build the existing relationships. The Free Library, in partnership with local Islamic leaders and their communities, are building a lasting relationship of inclusivity and partnership with the African American Islamic community while connecting them to these special gems.

 

 

Decloaking Wakanda: Creating Space for BIPOC Nerds

 

Sawgrass Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Workshop)

Speakers: Christina  Taylor Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Christina  Taylor Texas State Library and Archives Commission

David  Bowles University of Texas Río Grande Valley

Deimosa  Webber-Bey Scholastic Inc.

Jean  Darnell Dessau Middle School

 

Presenters will focus on connecting with nerd culture and creating a welcoming environment for the BIPOC fandom. Beginning with a very basic discussion of the benefits of reading comics and graphic literature, the session will largely focus on ways to tweak attendees’ existing skill set in order to signify that their library community can be as inviting a space as a fan’s favorite con, gaming hall, or local comic book shop. This workshop will equip attendees with ideas for leveraging existing practices as well as resources to aid in collection development and programming.

 

 

 

The Anatomy of EDI Consulting for Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Information Organizations

 

Banyan Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Kawanna Bright, East Carolina University

Mark Puente, Purdue University Libraries

Nikhat Ghouse, American University

 

Requests for equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) consultations for library, archive, museums, and information organizations have been on the rise, but the availability of qualified consultants is limited. Librarians of color may be capable and interested in engaging in this work but unsure of what it entails or how to begin. This panel will feature three experienced EDI consultants who will discuss the ins and outs of becoming a consultant, including expectations, marketing, negotiating, and fees. This panel will also benefit those interested in engaging a consultant for their organization.

 

 

 

 

Inclusive Policies Review: Identifying and Addressing Systems of Oppression in Library Policies

 

Sabal Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Susan Vega García, Iowa State University

 

 

Katie Wampole, Iowa State University

 

Policies are primary sites of institutional oppression. In 2020, the DEI Committee at an HWI research library developed an Inclusive Policies Review project to identify and address systems of oppression embedded in existing library policies with the goal of effecting positive policy change to create more inclusive environments for patrons and library staff. Presenters will discuss the methods and rubric used, systems of oppression often embedded in policies, and share results to date. Attendees will learn a method they can adapt for use at their libraries.

 

 

 

Concurrent Sessions 3: Friday, October 7th – 9:00 – 10:15AM

Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil: A Call for Libraries to Rewrite the Narrative for Communities of Color

 

Tarpon Key Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Panel)

Speakers:
Deidra Herring, Ohio State University
Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

 

Libraries are repositories of knowledge and gatekeepers of information. Our institutions can create new pathways and narratives to dispel traditions of inaccuracies and stereotypes regarding people of color and their contributions to society. To move forward, we must consider how narratives are shaped and how legacies will be recognized. To do so, we must provide a true and clearer picture of untold history and the struggles that remain. The panel will examine the importance of targeted programming, collection building, policy and the impact on communities of color.

 

 

I am My Brother’s Keeper, Peer Advocacy at LA County Library

Sawyer Key Room
Speakers:

Heather  Firchow, LA County Library
Jesus  Najera, Jr., LA County Library

My Brother’s Keeper at LA County Library has been a truly transformational program for everyone involved, particularly the young adults that are hired as Peer Advocates and are embedded in libraries in their communities where they gain valuable on-the-job training and work experience. We have experienced incredible highs as well as the inevitable challenges of managing this grant-funded program. We will share how the MBK program has opened the door to have more candid conversations about EDI at our library and how to best serve similar young people in your communities.

 

 

Mixed-race and Proud: How do Library Workers Gather for Action to Serve this Growing Population?

 

Long Key Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)  

Speakers:
Karen Downing,  University of Michigan
Marna Clowney-Robinson, University of Michigan
Jasmin Lee, University of Michigan
Donovan Johnson, University of Michigan

Numbers of mixed-race individuals are growing quickly in the U.S., though they are often invisible in our schools, communities, and campuses. How can library workers in all types of library settings ensure they are serving the unique needs of these individuals and those interested in mixed-race research? We will share ways to assess needs, and collaborate with teachers, faculty, community groups, departments, and student groups to promote library programs, collections and services to better support mixed race students, researchers and community members.

 

Antiracism and the Six C’s: Exploring the Six Signature Traits of Inclusive Leadership and its Connecting to Antiracism Initiative

Citrus Room
Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop) 
Speakers:
Thomas Dickens, Ohio State University
Twanna Hodge, University of Maryland, College Park

The “Six Signature Traits of Inclusive Leadership” is a leadership style that focuses on the skill set leaders need to build an inclusive environment. In this session, we will explore “Six Signature Traits of Inclusive Leadership” and how leaders in libraries can incorporate these traits into their organizations. We will also take the Inclusive Leadership framing and analyze how this applies explicitly to antiracism efforts in libraries.

 

 

 

 

Preserving Black Western Legacies

Track: Technology and Innovation (Individual Paper/Presentation + Lightning Talk)
Speakers:
Stevie Gunter, Denver Public Library

 

The Preserving Black Western Legacies project is conducted by Denver Public Library’s Special Collections and Digital Archives, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The purpose of the presentation is to thoroughly evaluate the workflows of the project since its start in November 2020, including challenges and opportunities imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, digital storytelling tools such as blogs and ArcGIS storymaps, and our content management system, ContentDM.

 

Reaching out to our forgotten colleagues: Expanding library services to minority staff in an academic institution

Track: Technology and Innovation (Individual Paper/Presentation + Lightning Talk)
Speakers:
Young-Joo Lee, Johns Hopkins University & Medicine

 

While most academic libraries claim that they serve students, staff, and faculty, in reality, staff are hardly served. They are our forgotten colleagues in the academic caste. In this presentation, I will share my outreach efforts for the AAPI employee group at our institution. My resources on AAPI history and events at the local public libraries for AAPI were eye-opening experience to most of the AAPI staff. The great appreciation by the employees show that we can make a great contribution to our community by including staff as a patron group.

 

 

 

Armed with Intellectual Freedom: Current Challenges and Next Steps

 

Glades Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration (Workshop) 

Speakers: Joyce McIntosh, Freedom to Read Foundation

 

Representatives from the Freedom to Read Foundation will offer an overview of the current campaign to censor and ban diverse books in schools and libraries and discuss how librarians can protect access to information and support the First Amendment while still maintaining the library’s identity as a welcoming and inclusive space that is an anti-racist, anti-homophobic, and social justice-based organization.

 

 

Reimagining Tenure and Promotion: Community Care as a New Model

 

Jasmine Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Roundtable) 

Speakers:

Tarida Anantachai, North Carolina State University

 

Camille Chesley, University at Albany

 

Over the past decade, discussions of systemic inequalities and the burdens facing BIPOC faculty and librarians on the tenure track have received increased attention. While most discussions on the tenure and promotion process focus on how faculty themselves can navigate its demands, this roundtable aims to flip this focus and instead brainstorm what a more equitable promotion system could look like-one that not simply based on productive output and institutional contribution, but rather, on fostering growth, professional development, and community care in academia.

 

 

Sankofa, Osiyo and Adelante! Tulsa City-County Library’s Journey to EDI. The Case for Resource Centers.

 

Bird Key Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers: Carrie  McClain  Tulsa City-County Library Amairani  Perez Chamu  Tulsa City-County Library Larissa  McNeil  Tulsa City-County Library

 

The Tulsa City-County Library System [TCCL] inaugurated its first Resource Center in 1998. The African American Resource Center was followed by the Hispanic Resource Center in 1999 and the American Indian Resource Center in 2003. Located at large regional libraries at strategic cardinal points in Tulsa, these centers serve a systemwide function while supporting and encouraging TCCL’s road to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion; this journey continues to be a work in progress. We will explore this journey in a lively session designed to guide and inspire.

 

How Do New Leaders Advance DEI Strategies at Their New Organizations? Case Studies of Four new Deans and University Librarians

 

Palm Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Leo  Lo  The University of New Mexico

Lis  Pankl  Mississippi State University

Alicia  Salaz  University of Oregon

 

Jeehyun  Davis  American University

 

Many universities now finally recognize the need of advancing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at an institutional level. For new deans and university librarians, it presents both challenges and opportunities. Four new leaders will discuss how they navigate their new roles, new institutions, and new cultures to develop strategies to advance DEI The panelists will present lessons learned and actionable items for those who aspire to take a leadership role in incorporating DEI efforts into their libraries’ strategy.

  

 

The Game Changer Becoming A School Librarian

 

Sabal Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop)

Speakers: Eboni Henry, DC Public Schools

Jahala Simuel, District of Columbia Public Schools

S.Michele Echols, NYC /D.O.E Science Skills Center High School

 

Do you have a mindset that you own your career? Or are you waiting for your boss to step in and make things happen for you? In this session, you will connect with other participants and hear from panelists as they stir your thinking and invite you to act on your career goals. Panelists will discuss their transition from an academic and public library settings to school librarianship. Often, transition into new diverse communities can present unique challenges. Participants will acquire the practical steps to begin winning in their career.

 

 

Paving the Journey with Intention: Curating our Pathway to Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Sawgrass Room Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop) Speakers: Carrie McClain, Tulsa City-County Library Tracy Scott, Tulsa City-County Library

During the past several years we have experienced unprecedented changes across the globe. These disruptions brought inequities to the forefront of many of our library systems, and fueled a call to be more courageous and to be agents of change. In 2018 Tulsa City-County Library began building the foundation of its Equity, Diversity and Inclusion department. This session will explore the steps taken on our journey to build and implement an ED&I department, from the formation of our EDI council, to programming, and most recent hiring of our inaugural Chief Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Officer

 

Concurrent Sessions 4: Friday, October 7th – 10:30 – 11:45AM

 

 

Bringing consumer protection topics to your library: How scams affect Black and Latino communities

Banyan Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Terri Miller, Federal Trade Commission

 

Your patrons are experiencing scams – do you know how to help them? Across the country, millions of people experience scams every year – and some lose money. Sometimes a lot of money. FTC data also suggests that fraud and bad business practices play out differently in majority Black communities versus majority White and Latino communities. In this session, we’ll talk about the top consumer protection issues in majority Black and majority Latino communities – and how you can help your patrons avoid these scams and bad business practices.

 

Collaborative Mapping: The Transfer Student of Color Journey

Banyan Room

 

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Rosalinda  Linares, Fort Lewis College

 

This session centers a collaboration between a librarian and a transfer student of color who partnered in research to learn more about the transfer journey of students of color and the role the library plays in their academic success. Through one-on-one interviews and focus groups, the research team explored BIPOC transfer students’ experiences and identified unique barriers that they face. In this session, participants will learn how libraries can help mitigate barriers that BIPOC transfer students face and identify potential services that would be most beneficial to them.

 

Respond to Community Needs and Cooperate through Interagency: Initiatives at Illinois Fire Service Institute Library

Banyan Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

 

Speakers:

Lian Ruan, Illinois Fire Service Institute Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

David Ehrenhart, Illinois Fire Service Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Diane Richardson, Illinois Fire Service Institute Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Shuyi Liu, llinois Fire Service Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

The presentation will introduce two grant projects at the Illinois Fire Service Institute Library to respond to community needs, strengthen community engagement, and support community collaboration. One of the projects is awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and titled Experienced-Based Knowledge Management Initiatives to Support Illinois Firefighters’ Dynamic Needs in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic. The other project is awarded by American Library Association (ALA) and titled Children Fire Safety Literacy Reading and Discussion Program.

 

 

Get crafty! Connecting with Vietnamese and Latine youth and families through culturally-specific programs

 

Citrus Room

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

Speakers: Bobbye  Hernandez  Newberg Public Library

Trang  Oliver  Multnomah County Library

Jeannine  Gonzalez  Multnomah County Library

Karen  Nguyen  Multnomah County Library

 

In this panel Trang Oliver, Bilingual Vietnamese Library Assistant, and Jeannine Gonzalez, Bilingual Spanish Youth Librarian, will share culturally-specific programs they used to connect with Vietnamese and Latine families in Portland, OR – in a culturally and linguistically diverse neighborhood with a high concentration of community members experiencing poverty. They focus on sharing collaborative processes in developing programs and activity kits for families and youth and how to promote these culturally specific offerings to ensure they reach target audiences. Time for Q&A and open sharing.

 

 

 

Braving Our Blind Spots: Using a Virtual Book Discussion Group to Continue Conversations on Implicit Bias in Libraries

 

Tarpon Key Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers:

Shannon  Jones  Medical University of South Carolina

Kelsa  Bartley  University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

 

Tamara  Nelson  University of Tennessee Health Science Center

 

Presenters will discuss the MLA Reads virtual book discussion group, created to inspire discussions on implicit bias. Since 2018, the program has provided information professionals with virtual safe spaces to learn, discuss, and process the implications of biases on their work and personal lives. Presenters will share insights gained from planning and facilitating multiple sessions to help readers confront difficult issues such as sexism, racism, inequality, and injustice. We will share lessons learned, challenges faced, and suggestions on implementing similar programs at other institutions.

 

 

 

Blindsided At Work: One Strike and Your Out

 

Glades Room Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop)

Speakers:Elaina  Norlin  ASERL

This workshop will explore a topic we rarely talk about in the workplace…how written and unwritten policies are weaponized to marginalize, penalize and push people out the door. Research has proven, that BIPOC faculty and staff are more likely to be blindsided at work, which is a major cause of eroding workplace morale. During this workshop, we will focus on how this happens, why this happens and review case studies to help people understand they are not alone and have resources at their disposal to help.

 

 

 

Equitable Learning Ecosystems for the 21st Century: A Guide to Applied Digital Skills

 

Jasmine Room

Track: Technology and Innovation (Workshop) 

Speakers: Jamillah  Scott-Branch  North Carolina Central University

Danielle  Colbert-Lewis  North Carolina Central University

Beverly  Charlot  North Carolina Central University

 

The academic learning environment and the workplace heavily depend on digital skills. The availability of free and or affordable textbooks and software supports equitable access to competitive skills. The Applied Digital Skills platform by Google for Education functions as a cloud-based open educational resource (OER) that is a digital literacy solution offering a free video-based curriculum for teaching and learning digital skills. This workshop will present participants with an overview of the benefits of Applied Digital Skills as a teaching and workforce development tool.

 

 

Health Literacy in our Communities: A Conversation with the Network of the National Library of Medicine and its partnership with the All of Us Research Program

 

Sabal Room

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Roundtable)

Speakers:

Veronica  Milliner  Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM)

 

Stefania  Acosta Ramirez  NNLM – University of Iowa

 

What are some programs, resources, and services that support health literacy in underrepresented communities? Bring your ideas and questions to this roundtable discussion where we will focus on health activities in libraries. We invite information professionals from different types of libraries to share knowledge and best practices around health engagement with the public, specifically focused on populations underrepresented in biomedical research. This discussion will also be an opportunity to learn about resources and tools to support health and research literacy in our communities

 

 

  

Beyond Performative: Experiences of an Action-focused DEIA Committee

 

Palm Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: V.  Dozier  University of San Diego

In August 2020, Copley Library at the University of San Diego (USD) formally created the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility (DEIA) Committee in response to the Black Lives Matter movement, #MeToo movement, and the repeated, violent attacks on people from marginalized groups on our campus and in the larger society. This session will highlight our formation and some initiatives undertaken since 2020, particularly our professional development work and research. We hope to empower other participants involved in DEIA work and brainstorm other action-oriented ideas.

 

I have something to say: Increasing BIPOC voices at conferences and workshops

Palm Room Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation) Speakers: Tiffany  Davis  University of North Carolina at Charlotte Bridgette  Sanders  UNC Charlotte

Calls for conference proposal submissions often include language welcoming proposals from underrepresented and marginalized groups. A blind review process is used by several conference committees, so how will these groups be identified? Conference representation of these groups will be examined through a sampling of conference programs and schedules. Recommendations will be made for ways to increase the voices of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) librarians at conferences. We will provide suggestions for increasing outreach for presenters from BIPOC groups.

 

Interrogating monoracial barriers in the archives

Palm Room Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation) Speakers: Shelly  Black  North Carolina State University Libraries Victor  Betts  North Carolina State University

Libraries have systemically excluded not only communities of color, but mixed race people through harmful classification and descriptive practices. The language and taxonomies used in library and archival collections reflect white and monoracial normativity, thus impairing our ability to find resources and learn about mixed race identity. This presentation will address these impacts and how libraries can reclaim the humanity of mixed race people in their collections and the historical record.

 

 

 

Understanding the Micro-messaging of Microaggressions & Responding to Create Change

Sawgrass Room Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Workshop) Speakers: Carrie McClain, Tulsa City-County Library

We aim towards and want to build more equitable and inclusive working spaces and library systems, yet microaggressions continue to persist and disrupt our efforts towards change. Whether an observer, target, or unintentional perpetrator of microaggressions, we often don’t know how to respond to them in the moment. This interactive training will offer participants a deeper understanding of microaggressions and their impacts, and review a range of strategies that can be used in various contexts to help individuals feel more skilled and empowered to interrupt microaggressions.

 

 

 

Centering the AA&PI experience with actionable plans and programs

 

Sawyer Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers: Caterina  Reed  Stony Brook University

Janet  Clarke  Stony Brook University

Eric  Hung

With anti-Asian hate, racism, and violence on the rise, this panel seeks to contribute to the creative and necessary ways that organizations can build a sustainable structure, inclusive community, and curricula that reflects AAPI needs, experiences, and histories. Panelists will share strategies for building a sustainable campus-wide organization, securing institutional commitment, creating programs that educate and enlighten, and integrating AAPI issues into MLIS curricula. Participants will enjoy an interactive session with practical applications that can be adapted to their organizations.

 

 

See Change: BIPOC Worker-Led Collective Approaches

 

Long Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel) 

Speakers: Anthony  LaBat  University of Missouri-Kansas City

Sandy  Rodriguez  University of Missouri-Kansas City Tracey  Hughes  University of Missouri-Kansas City

 

Inspired by we here®’s model of peer mentorship and community building, this session will examine the UMKC Libraries’ BIPOC worker-led initiatives that informed major structural changes and ongoing social accountability, including the development of anonymous feedback mechanisms, a Libraries Worker Relief Fund, and equitable outcomes from a list of demands created after the 2020 racial reckonings. Panelists will provide insight into how to acknowledge one’s positionality, build collective power and agency, and enact strategies in order to create a sea change to see change.

 

 

 

Concurrent Sessions 5: Friday, October 7th – 2:00 – 3:15PM

“Llamale a la de los Libros” Advocacy through Audiobooks for Blind and Visually Impaired Adult Spanish-Speakers with Braille Institute of Orange County, in Anaheim CA.

 

Banyan Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Erica  Rodriguez  Braille Institute Of Orange County, Anaheim Ca.

An analysis is presented of the current situation of literacy services through advocacy for inclusion among Spanish-speaking blind and visually impaired adults. An overall view is offered on the evaluation of current inclusion processes presented in the format of audio books through the use of a Digital Talking Book Player, and the BARD mobile application. A program of future recommendations for implementation is outlined.

 

LatinX and Native American Communities’ Conversations about COVID-19

Banyan Room
Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)
Speakers:
Nora  Franco  University of California San Francisco at ZSFG Library
Yamila  El Khayat  University of Arizona
Lara  Miller  Oxford College – Emory University

The grant-funded outreach program “Community Conversations about COVID-19” brought together three medical librarians, Community Health Workers, and Native Patient Navigators from communities in Tucson and University of Arizona 2nd year medical students. Our program designed “cafecitos” which opened conversations about accessing and discussing local, culturally sensitive health information including those from the National Library of Medicine, CDC, among others. Our presentation will detail the program’s functions, outcomes, and challenges in working with predominantly white institutions.

 

Podcasts Created to Confront Covid-19 Pandemic Misinformation: Librarians and the JUNTOS Center for Advancing Latino Health Partner to Provide Credible Health Information to the Latinx Community

Banyan Room
Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)
Speakers: Brenda  Linares  University of Kansas Medical Center

The goal of this project was to address misinformation and the health information needs within the Latinx community and to connect them with health literacy skill-building tools and easy to understand health information and resources. To address the increasing use of social media and digital technologies within the Latinx community, the JUNTOS Health Literacy project sought to reach out to this community via recorded Spanish-language health educational programs (e.g., podcasts) complemented with evidence-based, Spanish language consumer health information.

 

  

Mapping Native Intellectual Networks of the Northeast

 

Citrus Room

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Roundtable)

Speakers:

Brandon Castle, Amherst College

Mike Kelly, Amherst College

 

 

In 2013, Amherst College acquired one of the most comprehensive collections of books by Native authors. The collection includes fiction, poetry, history, philosophy, Indigenous language texts, children’s books, and much more. The collection has grown to include over 3,000 books, documenting a wide spectrum of Native writing and intellectual life from the 18th century to the present. In this session, participants will learn about how an academic institution such as Amherst College has worked to strengthen relations with Indigenous communities represented in the collection.

 

 

Allies and Allyship in LIS 

 

Glades Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation + Lightning Talk)
Speakers:

Lisa Hussey, Simmons University

Erin DeCurtis, Simmons University

Andy Yzaguirre, Simmons University

 

In LIS, there needs a better understanding of what it means to be an ally and to engage with allyship, as well as how these concepts are perceived and defined by both those who are carrying out actions, as well as those who are receiving the intended support. This research focuses on the definitions of and the behaviors associated with being an ally and participating in allyship amongst professionals in LIS in the United States.

 

Say My Name: Dealing with Microaggressions at Work

Glades Room
Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation + Lightning Talk)
Speakers: Moon Kim, Ohio State University

POC information professionals encounter different kinds of microaggressions in the workplace. While most institutional microaggressions trainings are designed for the aggressors and allies, this presentation is intended to flip the script to center those that are being microaggressed. The presenter will provide an autoethnographic account of accumulated microaggressions in the form of getting misnamed, and explore strategies on how to take action.

 

 

Compassion Satisfaction: Redressed Professional Stress and Representation Burnout

Glades Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Individual Paper/Presentation + Lightning Talk)

Speakers: Kay Coates GA Southern University

 

Opportunities for deliberating on vocational wellness viz-a viz occupational stress and representation burnout from the perspective of intersectionality that impacts minoritized library practitioners can be viewed as an allowable indulgence that COVID-19 pandemic has provided. As facilitators operating in a seemingly ‘safe’ service entity, Black women practitioners overwhelmingly experience a multiplicity of ‘other’ adventures throughout their working life. Hence, the occupational space of their quality of life can be called into question. Compassion satisfaction could be the saving grace.

 

 

Repositioning power and privilege in the library: Centering underrepresented colleagues at work

Jasmine Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Caterina Reed, Stony Brook University

 

Too often respect is associated with placement in hierarchy or perceived level of professionalism; unfortunately this means that underrepresented staff can find themselves ranked low in the communication chain at work. This can lead to feelings of distrust and devaluation. This presentation will discuss how listening to and recognizing labor of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) library staff answers deeper calls to action within EDI. Participants will learn how to take action, including how to prioritize BIPOC voices and perceive BIPOC staff as invaluable colleagues in libraries.

 

 

The Perception of How Using Collegiality in Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Impacts BIPOC Librarians

Jasmine Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:

Leo Lo, The University of New Mexico

Lis Pankl, Mississippi State University

Jason Coleman, Kansas State University

 

Using the concept of “collegiality” as an evaluation factor in faculty promotion and tenure (P&T) has been a hotly debated topic. How would it impact BIPOC librarians? The presenters conducted a survey study in 2021 and found that only about 36% of the white respondents, but almost 60% of non-white responendts thought that using “collegiality” as an evaluation factor would negatively affect minority faculty. This presentation will discuss key findings and the qualitative comments regarding how both white and non-white respondents view the use of collegiality would impact minority librarians.

 

Understanding the Experiences of Academic Librarians of Color Using Narrative Inquiry

Jasmine Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

 

Speakers: Martin Garnar, Amherst College

 

In this study, 5 current and 5 former academic librarians of color were interviewed about their experiences in the profession. Using Critical Race Theory as a framework, their counternarratives explore 5 themes: their personal experiences as librarians; the importance of connections; their experiences with the culture of librarianship; the work of diversity, equity, and inclusion; and their solutions for the identified issues. Recommendations include changing LIS education, hiring more people of color, providing mentoring, talking about race, and revisiting core principles of librarianship.

 

 

We Shine: Creating a BIPOC Affinity Group in a Predominately White Organization

Jasmine Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

 

Speakers: Amanda Landis, Smithsonian Libraries and Archives

Affinity groups can be mutually beneficial for both employees and organizations. Unfortunately, attempting to carve out a safe space in predominantly white organizations can be disheartening at best, and dangerous at worst. However, it is not impossible! Amanda E. Landis, Librarian for Smithsonian Libraries and Archives, presents how she established a BIPOC affinity group in an overwhelmingly white, conservative institution. This case study will cover crafting a proposal that encourages management approval, how to address and overcome opposition, and garner support throughout the workplace.

 

 

Wondering How to Engage Families in Literacy Activities? With Wonderopolis, of course!

Tarpon Key Room

Track: Technology and Innovation (Panel)

Speakers:
Emily  Sedgwick  National Center for Families Learning–NCFL

Kristen  Whitaker  National Center for Families Learning–NCFL

Amanda  Free  National Center for Families Learning–NCFL

 

Today, many families are immersed in the world of school at home. What resources can librarians share that are informative and engaging for families and incorporate innovative tech strategies? Wonderopolis® is a digital resource that provides relevant content in multiple subject areas. Learn to integrate Wonders of the Day® to build literacy skills, increase engagement, and deepen the impact of learning.

 

 

Bringing Asian Pacific American Library Workers Together: An Overview of “Path to Leadership” Program

 

Palm Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:

Wenli  Gao  University of Houston

Lessa  Pelayo-Lozada  Palos Verdes Library District

Lian  Ruan  Illinois Fire Service Institute Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Ray Pun  Alder Graduate School of Education

 

The Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) and Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) received an IMLS National Forum Grant to support the project called Path to Leadership: National Forum to Advance Asian/Pacific Islander American Librarianship. This presentation will explore the needs for such a project, project goals, the national forum, leadership webinars, and the reunion event at ALA Annual 2022. Presenters will share the planning process, what we learned from participants, and plans to foster leadership development for APIA library workers going forward.

 

Diversifying Data Librarianship via a National Internship Program: Paid Practical Experiences for POC

Palm Room
Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)
Speakers:
Maria  Arteaga Cuevas  National Center for Data Services
Aundria  Parkman
Robert  Rosas  NYU Langone Health
Stacy  Carter  NYU Langone
Peace  Ossom-Williamson  NNLM National Center for Data Services
Genevieve  Milliken  NYU Health Sciences Library
Nicole  Contaxis  NYU Health Sciences Library
Justin  de la Cruz  NNLM National Center for Data Services

In efforts toward diversifying the field of data librarianship and providing opportunities for grad students of color, a national center developed a 10-week paid summer internship program. The internship provides mentored data training, career guidance, and professional networks, and interns are embedded into the tasks and complexities of data librarianship, while being provided ongoing guidance for success. This presentation will detail the structure and assessment of the internship, working with external EDI-guidance in development of the program, and results from the first cohort.

 

Preserving the Future by (Re)living the Past: Black Librarians and Social Change

Palm Room
Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)
Speakers:

Tiffany Davis, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Bridgette Sanders, UNC Charlotte

 

Activism in the Black community is not new. Many African Americans have fought and died for change and an equal place at the American table. African American Librarians are no different. Equity, diversity, and inclusion are core values of librarianship, but we’re still a long way from library staff reflecting the demographics of their communities. This presentation will discuss the history of and pioneers in black librarianship, and activism among African American librarians. We will also discuss the recruitment and mentorship of black librarians because the numbers are remaining stagnant.

 

Smashing the Bamboo Ceiling: Strategies for Advancing APIAs into Senior-Level Academic Library Administrators

 Palm Room
Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)
Speakers: Binh LeThe Pennsylvania State University

The number of APIAs holding senior-level administrative positions in American academic libraries is disproportionally dismal. Like their APIA counterparts in other industries, APIA academic librarians tend to be stuck at the bottom in their organization’s administrative and leadership structure. How can APIAs change the leadership landscape in American academic libraries? In this interactive session, the presenter will present a series of strategies concerning what APIA librarians need to do in order to advance into senior-level administrative and leadership positions in academic libraries.

 

 

 

Tag Us! Implementing Teaching, Metadata and Collection Analysis for Diversity

 

Sawyer Key Room

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

Speakers:
Suzan Alteri, California State University Fresno

Brittany Kester, University of Florida

Rachael Elrod, University of Florida

Kenneth Kidd, University of Florida

 

This presentation discusses the ongoing work of the Diverse BookFinder (DBF) to provide librarians, teachers, and parents with a searchable database of diverse children’s, middle grade, and young adult literature. This proposed session will acquaint attendees with the DBF, discuss the complexities of metadata tagging, the development of communities of practice, adding quality ratings, and conclude with how attendees can use the Collection Analysis Tool to diversify their collections and other action steps to integrate into collection development and cataloging.

 

 

 

Informing the Future: Black Speculative Librarianship, Afrofuturism, and Information Literacy

 

Sabal Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Roundtable)

Speakers: Robyn Reed, Schaffer Library – Union College

 

Using afrofuturism as a lens, this round table discussion will explore the speculative nature of black librarianship. Afrofuturism is an aesthetic and a movement that reexamines the black experience and its relationship to technology in the past yet it is, undeniably a path forward. We will see how afrofuturism can be applied to library instruction and information literacy frameworks.Adjacent to critical librarianship, afrofuturism centers blackness and dismantles white western constructions of identity to project more representative black futures and can be an excellent pedagogical tool.

 

 

 

 

Where do you stand?

 

Long Key Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers:
Lourdes  Santamaría-Wheeler  University of Florida

Twanna  Hodge  University of Maryland, College Park

Katiana  Bagué  University of Florida

 

Libraries are more than content providers. They can also be content creators with power to influence narratives. This power should be wielded carefully and conscientiously. Positionality statements are one way to be mindful and transparent of the power we hold. Used primarily in publications, positionality statements can become a larger part of library practice and be incorporated into exhibits and research guides. These small actions with major ripple effects can be used to address the persistence of vocational awe, oppressive thinking, the misconception of neutrality, and willful ignorance.

 

 

 

We Are the Path: Developing Staff of Color & Communities of Action

 

Bird Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:
Gregory  Diaz  Chicago Public Library

Mariella  Colon  Chicago Public Library

 

While libraries are slowly adopting a DEI approach, new librarians who are just entering the field often find themselves in a position with little support and guidance. For librarians of color, lack of mentorship and development opportunities can lead to untapped skills, limited career advancement, and dissatisfaction with the profession. In this session, team leaders from the Chicago Public Library (CPL) will explore the systemic, structural barriers that isolate staff of color, and will discuss practical tools and organizational structures that have helped CPL mentor staff of color.

 

 

 

A Model for Change: EDI Efforts and Strategies in Academic, Public, and Special Libraries

Sawgrass Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Laura  Tadena  Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Martha  Anderson  University of Arkansas Libraries

Thomas  Dickens  Ohio State University

 

Francesca  Haynes  Lawrence Public Library

 

In this session, colleagues from Academic, Public, and Special Libraries tasked with leading EDI efforts for their respective libraries will serve as panelists to share insight on their roles and what their journey has entailed. With these diverse perspectives, this session will provide strategies for leading EDI efforts in libraries, best practices for organizations to consider when building a more equitable and inclusive organization, and critical considerations to support the development of EDI positions within libraries.

 

 

 

Poster Session: Friday, October 7- 4:30-6:00 PM, Horizons East/West Room

 

Achieving Economic Freedom For Library Staff Through Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Presented by: Kyra Hahn, Denver Public Library

 

Are you eligible for federal student loan forgiveness? Come learn about the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program offered by the US Department of Education and recent changes to see if you are now eligible for student loan forgiveness. Learn how to navigate the paperwork and make progress towards loan forgiveness from someone who successfully achieved student loan forgiveness in the program. Learn about advocacy efforts to raise awareness of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program within librarianship and how this is a tool for economic liberation from educational debt.

 

 

 

Adopting an HBCU Mindset at PWIs: How Librarians at Historically White Institutions can Better Serve their Black Students by adopting policies from Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Presented by: Simone Williams, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

 

Academic libraries at predominately white institutions can learn how to foster a positive campus climate for their Black students and by extension other underrepresented groups (other persons of color,LGBTQIA+, minority religious groups, elders, non-traditional students, and disabled students) by adopting strategies used by historically black universities. In order to create inclusive environments and to build bridges with black students, academic libraries have to adopt an ethic of authentic care, cultural advancement and competency, and institutional guardianship.

 

Analyzing and Enhancing CMC Biography Subject Headings for Race and Gender

Presented by:

Peter Spyers-Duran, University of Central Florida

Sai Deng, University of Central Florida Libraries

Jeanne Piascik, University of Central Florida Libraries

Amy Dovydaitis, University of Central Florida Curriculum Materials Center

 

With equity, diversity, and inclusion in mind, and to improve access to the juvenile biographies in the University of Central Florida Curriculum Materials Center (CMC) Library, librarians from cataloging, CMC and ILL, analyzed 952 bibliographic records and enhanced subject headings with biographees’ gender, race, nationality and other information. Statistics were compiled to measure subject headings for biases and inequalities. Local subjects, LCSH, LC Demographic Group Terms and Homosaurus terms were added to aid students to discover materials for the diverse population they will teach.

 

 

Attracting and Engaging a Diverse Student Workforce at George Mason University Libraries
Presented by:

Kathleen  Bell  George Mason University

 

Katara  Hofmann  George Mason University

 

George Mason University Libraries seeks to improve recruitment, engagement, and retention of students of color for all student worker positions in our library units. The project is supported by Hampton University’s Leading the Charge grant (Institute of Museum and Library Services RE-246407-OLS-20). This poster will outline the research procedures, inclusion of anti-racist research practices, and brief overview of findings and next steps prior to the project completion in Spring 2023.

 

 

Build Better Readers – Improving adult literacy is part of our mission too!
Presented by:
Richenda Hawkins,  Linn-Benton Community College

 

Learn how our community college library collaborated with numerous community agencies to create a volunteer-run adult literacy program. The Linn Benton Community Literacy Partnership provides tutoring to English and Spanish speaking adults with low literacy, training for literacy tutors, ongoing support for both tutors and learners, meeting spaces, kits of learning resources, laptops and internet hotspots for check out. The most remarkable aspects of our program are the broad coalition of community service organizations involved and the extensive collection of literacy resources in Spanish.

 

 

Check Out the Molly of Denali at Your Library Initiative

Presented by:
Melinda  Sandkam  University of Tennessee Knoxville

Loriene  Roy  University of Texas, Austin

 

Molly of Denali is the first nationally distributed children’s series to feature a Native American lead character. Many of the Molly of Denali episodes feature the Qyah library which is an important resource to Molly and her friends providing a plethora of informational texts (IT). The Molly of Denali at Your Library Initiative provides a free event guide and digital toolkit designed to help libraries host family events based on the award-winning series.

 

 

Claiming Space: Leading Community-Centered Change

Presented by: Sheila Garcia Mazari, Grand Valley State University

 

Using intentional community building, inclusive collection development principles, and facilitated conversations about values and space, this poster will outline how one library has sought to create a holistic approach to user experience research. By focusing on the relationship students have to the space in addition to its use, the library partnered with student communities to ground user engagement with space, supporting a cartonera collection highlighting Undocumented/DACA student voices and a collective engagement agreement addressing the gaps between the library’s stated and lived values.

 

 

Data-Driven Engagement to Underrepresented in Biomedical Research Populations

Presented by:
Laura  Bartlett  National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Hacer  Karamese  University of Iowa, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

Sharon  Han  University of Iowa, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

Stefania  Acosta Ramirez  NNLM – University of Iowa

 

Our poster will describe our use of community-level data from Census and HRSA, to identify libraries and organizations that are located within communities with underrepresented in biomedical research populations (UBR). To address this, we developed a data dashboard in Microsoft PowerBI that identifies Zip Code Tabulation Area (ZCTAs) to identify areas with significant representation of UBR communities. The authors will describe the dashboard development process including using Rstudio to access and manipulate the data, and evaluating data visualization tools.

 

 

Disobedience and Disruption in LIS

Presented By:

Crystal Chen, The New York Public Library

Nicollette  Davis, Louisiana State University

 

This poster session will investigate acts of disobedience and disruption as tools for positive change within institutions aligned with white supremacy culture. Acts of disobedience can serve as protective boundaries as well as methods of self- and peer-advocacy within BIPOC library communities. Overt disobedience may not always be attainable, but library workers can find methods to “disobey” and disrupt in various ways. Through acts of disobedience, BIPOC library workers can reject ideas of organizational loyalty, disrupt white supremacy culture, and make room for meaningful change.

 

 

Engaging the campus community through gender and equity programming and research
Presented by:
Alexa Carter, NC State University Libraries

 

In support of growing campus research on gender and equity issues, librarians at a large public university have collaborated with campus partners to develop programming to highlight ongoing social justice work. The events give students, faculty, staff, and community partners the opportunity to learn, share, and demonstrate new ways of connecting with equity and gender topics and further promote engagement with innovative, interdisciplinary research. This presentation will spotlight many of the benefits of creating such programming, including opportunities for integrating research support.

 

Finding Our Way: Mapping out a Diversity Action Plan

Presented By:

Adelia Grabowsky,  Auburn University

Arlene Brown,  Auburn University

 

In 2021, as part of a campus-wide initiative, Auburn University Libraries (AUL) was asked to develop a Diversity Action Plan (DAP). The DAP was to first identify current diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) problem areas and then detail how those problem areas might be improved. This presentation will discuss the steps taken to develop the initial DAP, including procedures intended to ensure that all AUL employees had opportunities to help select the DEI issues to address in the initial plan as well as to suggest potential tactics to improve the issues.

 

 

Mapping Student Success at a Historically Black University

Presented by: Harvey Long, North Carolina A&T State University

 

Being a student success librarian means different things at different institutions. However, most are concerned with supporting undergraduate student learning, research, and outreach. This poster will map how the inaugural student success librarian at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University – the nation’s largest HBCU – approached student success by mapping campus partners. This poster’s audience is librarians engaged in similar work and library administrators who support this evolving area of librarianship.

 

Only the Beginning: Engaging Underrepresented Students at the University of Illinois

Presented by:

Janis  Shearer  University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Maria  Emerson  University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Jessica  Ballard  University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Emilee  Mathews  University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

 

The presenters will summarize approaches that have increased underrepresented student engagement in the library. Methods such as workshops, instruction, library guides, and various special and collaborative projects will be highlighted. This poster will explain how these methods and approaches build trust, and create sustainable relationships with various campus units to provide an environment that better serves the needs of underrepresented communities.

 

 

Preserving the Future by (Re)living the Past: Black Librarians and Social Change

Presented by:

Bridgette Sanders, UNC Charlotte

Tiffany Davis, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Activism in the Black community is not new. Many African Americans have fought and died for change and an equal place at the American table. African American Librarians are no different. Equity, diversity, and inclusion are core values of librarianship, but we’re still a long way from library staff reflecting the demographics of their communities. This presentation will discuss the history of and pioneers in black librarianship, and activism among African American librarians. We will also discuss the recruitment and mentorship of black librarians because the numbers are remaining stagnant.

 

 

Reparative Archives Project

Presented by: Shelbi  Webb  UNC Greensboro

 

The presentation shows UNC Greensboro’s Martha Hodges Special Collections and University Archives’ project of combing through collection-level finding aids for culturally insensitive descriptions and rectifying them while documenting the process for future use. The mission entails showing proponents of information institutions the presence of harmful, colonial influence in archives and a possible path toward anti-oppressive archives. Such exhibitions are necessary to boost EDI within information institutions, because they help to dismantle the illusion of traditional archives as neutral.

 

 

The Ashley Bryan Project: A Resource Celebrating Books and Book Art that Accurately Represents the Diversity of Children of African Descent

Presented by: Lisa Jackson, Broward County African American Research Library and Cultural Center

 

This poster session will highlight a growing digital annotated resource guide that promotes racially sensitive, affirming and accurately representative books about youth of African descent that can be used with children of all races. This resource provides illustrator bibliographies, teacher guides and other materials that adults who work with children may use to foster a love of art, reading and anti-racism in all children. A unique feature of this resource is the digital art collection of original works of art from illustrators who have been awarded the Coretta Scott King Award.

 

 

The Only Ones: Strategies to Help Early Career Librarians of Color Succeed Within the White Ivory Tower

Presented by:

Margarita Shawcross, University of Northern Colorado

Keno Catabay, University of Northern Colorado

 

Two academic librarians of color will share their experiences as racial minorities in tenure-track positions at a mid-sized university. In this presentation, presenters will discuss the current state of diversity in academic libraries as well as how race, power, and privilege play in being an academic librarian. Participants will learn the importance of having a tenure plan and the time management needed to focus on strategic scholarly and service activity. Lastly, participants will learn about strategies, such as building support networks, and receive resources to help them be successful.

 

 

“Partnering for Action: A Library-Museum Collaboration for Local Black Cultural Heritage”

Presented by:

Alicia Long,  State College of Florida-Manatee-Sarasota & University of South Florida

Kathie Marsh,  Family Heritage House Museum Meg Hawkins,  State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota

 

This cultural-heritage poster presents the history and characteristics of a long-standing collaboration between an academic library (the State College of Florida Libraries) and a local museum of African American heritage (the Family Heritage House Museum), including the strategical and practical considerations that contribute to a successful partnership, and the benefits for both institutions. It also includes a reflection on the role the partnership plays in both institutions’ DEI efforts, as well as future opportunities to make the collaboration more impactful.

 

Concurrent Sessions 6: Saturday, October 8th – 9:00 – 10:15AM

Libraries Taking Care of Business: Stories of Peer Support and Community Engagement

Tarpon Key Room 

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Panel) 

Speakers:
Sheldon  Burke 

Ron Gauthier 

Megan Janicki, American Library Association

Beatrice Pulliam, Providence Public Library

Adriana McCleer, Appleton Public Library


Public library workers are uniquely positioned to advance equity and challenge the status quo around community initiatives supporting entrepreneurship and small business. Join ALA’s Libraries Build Business (LBB) initiative cohort members as they share concrete examples and discuss outcomes from their respective projects and LBB collaborations to support underrepresented communities growing their businesses in partnership with public libraries. Program attendees will learn about small business initiatives that prioritize equity, diversity, and inclusion.



The New Normal: A Discussion about the Long Term Impact of Covid-19 On Library Staff and Patrons

Sawyer Key Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

Speakers:
Safi Safiullah, Salt Lake City Public Library

Andrea Jamison, Illinois State University

Allison Spehar, Salt Lake City Public Library

Sara Hack, City of Saint Petersburg/ University of South Florida


Panelists will discuss how public, school, and academic libraries have shifted during the pandemic and the next steps for re-imaging services for the future. Panelists will also address how librarians have been experiencing the pandemic. Despite suffering financially and emotionally, librarians around the nation remained active to support their respective communities. Many lost their jobs or had to work under reduced hours, staffing reductions, and health issues.


Patrons Ideas, though community engagement by centering BIPOC voices: Community Conversations and Social Justice Book Groups Long Key Room  Track: Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration (Workshop) Speakers: James Davis, Denver Library Org Mónica Lozano, Denver Public Library 

R.A.D.A. stands for Read. Awareness. Dialogue. Action. This is a social-issues-based book discussion group that started at the Denver Public Library in 2015. The R.A.D.A. model is a way to create a space where your library can engage in relevant conversations around social justice issues that impact your communities. DPL’s Social Justice Book Club is a book club that has been conducted mostly virtual setting and has made a conscious decision to only read BIPOC authors reading books of a wide variety of genres. Come engage, and discuss why these programs are successful and relevant


Womxn of Color in Library Management: A discussion of how our own intersectionalities guide us to strive for inclusive public library workspaces.

Bird Key Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:
Mayra Corn, Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Chantel Clark, LVCCLD

Lenika Coleman, LVCCLD

Tanya Brown-Wirth, LVCCLD


This program present the realities of the diversity gap in the leadership pipeline in LIS. The objective is to delve into the lived experiences, commonalities, and highlight strategies for success used by Womxn of Color in library management and leadership roles. This program is presented as a panel discussion hosted and moderated by all womxn of color who hold leadership roles in a public library system. The discussion will be centered around three primary topics: (1) our experiences and challenges faced by womxn of color in LIS (2) discussion on wellness, and (3) advocacy and allyship.



Building Belonging in Collections: moving the conversation forward on anti-racism in public libraries

Palm Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Workshop) 

Speakers:
Diane Garcia, Los Angeles public library

Dan Nishimoto, Los Angeles Public Library


When a patron steps into a public library, we like to tell them that thousands of titles are available at their fingertips — but, for many, that promise of accessibility is false. An entire collection quickly whittles down to a tiny fraction when searching for BIPOC titles. In this presentation, we examine how historical devaluing of BIPOC stories has led to continuous institutional oversight, and how we can engage stakeholders to begin shifting the tide towards equity and belonging by committing to transformative dialogue and action.




Engaging Beyond Our Walls: Libraries as Hubs for Making Neighborhood Games and Storytelling

Citrus Room

Track: Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration (Workshop)

Speakers:
Allie Genia, DC Public Library

Victor Benítez, DC Public Library


Engaging Beyond Our Walls is a new project in 25 cities to create local history and community-based games with residents and collaborators. Libraries are frequently the only neighborhood institution to provide access to history and promote digital inclusion. The COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated the need for extending our programs’ reach outside of our buildings. Our session highlights successful games from several pilot cities that connect community members to local art and history using only the texting app on their phones.




Engineering Change in Libraries: On the Challenges of Dislocation, Inclusion, and Coming “Home” to Ourselves and our Communities

Glades Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Workshop)

Speakers:

Ajit Pyati, University of Western Ontario

Clara Chu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


This workshop session draws inspiration from the Engineering Change in Libraries: A Pathway for Meaningful Action series of workshops, which was co-facilitated by the presenters. In the session, we focus on the theme of dislocation and what it means for us, as libraries and practitioners, and our communities. We focus not only not only on libraries but also on how our inner lives can be connected to outer change. Thus, we will both introduce and engage in contemplative practices to understand how we can identify our feelings of dislocation in order to come “home” to ourselves.




What does a racially-just library ecosystem look like?

Banyan Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers:
Lessa Pelayo-Lozada, Palos Verdes Library District

Caterina M.Reed-Araujo, Stony Brook University Libraries

Cindy Hohl, The Kansas City Public Library

Sai Deng,University of Central Florida Libraries

Shauntee Burns-Simpson, The New York Public Library

Vanessa Reyes, University of South Florida


The journey towards a racially-just ALA and libraries has been a long one, on a path paved by many pioneering librarians of color and allies. While substantial change has taken place, in order to remain relevant to our users and our staff, we must continue efforts to dismantle oppressive systems and center our organizations in actively anti-racist cultures of care and empathy. Panelists will discuss how this work is a journey, and their vision for getting to a racially-just library ecosystem, offering encouragement, support, and advice for the long road ahead.



Unpacking the Pipeline: The Unspoken Emotional Labor of POC in Diversity Initiatives

Jasmine Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Denisse Solis, University of Denver

Jesus Espinoza. University of Michigan


This panel aims to critically examine diversity-focused initiatives such as the ALA Spectrum Scholarship Program and ARL Kaleidoscope Initiative in order to reveal disparities in these programs, provide a new perspective on diversity-focused programs with a contextualized discussion of the additional burdens or labor placed upon BIPIC individuals in our field, particularly throughout the process of competing for and being selected for diversity initiatives, and provide recommendations for improvement.



The Black Librarian in America: Reflections, Resistance, and Reawakening – Celebrating 50 Years of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

Sabal Room

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop)

Speakers:
Nichelle M. Hayes, BCALA

Shauntee Burns-Simpson, New York Public Library

Ana Ndumu, University of Maryland College Park

Shaundra  Walker, Georgia College & State University


In celebration of 50 years of encouraging, nurturing, supporting & inspiring African American librarians, BCALA has released The Black Librarian in America: Reflections, Resistance, and Reawakening, the latest volume in a series. This collection of essays is written by and about African American librarians and brings attention to issues of race, diversity, leadership, recruitment, and activism within the library profession. The first volume in the series edited entirely by women. This work is important because the struggles and triumphs of Black Librarian is important to the entire profession.



Centered in Care: Sustaining Wellness and Creativity through Community Practice

Sawgrass Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop)

Speakers:Jewel Davis, Appalachian State University


In this workshop, participants will explore using creative reflection as a sustainable care practice and learn how a community of care can support personal and professional development. Participants will see examples of ways to practice visual journaling as self-care and as a way to make creative meaning of the world around us. Prompts will be offered throughout the workshop for participants to practice creative reflection and journaling. The session will close with a list of resources and practical suggestions for participants to use in their personal and professional practice.

Concurrent Sessions 7: Saturday, October 8th – 10:30 – 11:45AM

Entrenched Narratives: Memory and Information Work in the Wake of America 250

Banyan Room 

Track Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Patrice Green, Penn State University

 

In 2026, the United States will celebrate its 250th anniversary as an independent nation. Cultural heritage and information workers have a unique opportunity to combat entrenched narratives through exhibitions and interpretation. In this presentation, I look to connect our understanding of cultural critical information literacy to the stories used to romanticize the nation’s history. Built on a long held tradition of misinformation and disinformation, how institutions handle the 250th and the scholarship it produces can affect legislation, education, and social interaction for decades to come.

 

 

 

The DEIA Data Toolkit: Calling to Action to Help Diversity Researchers Manage Open Data Expectations

Banyan Room 

Track Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:
Karen Downing, University of Michigan

Rachel Woodbrook, University of Michigan

Emma De Vera, Saint Paul Public Library

 

Research and scholarship practices and policies are changing to better address our diverse society. Among these changes is the expectation that research data be made more accessible. Diversity scholarship is especially important in this context as it relates to identity, culture, power, oppression and inequality, and it may involve marginalized or vulnerable communities. We report outcomes of a project examining diversity scholars’ data practices and needs, and share a DEI Data Toolkit that can be used to guide data services provided to diversity researchers.

 

 

 

Transform Your Library on a Dime Using Patron Centered Design

Banyan Room 

Track Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:

Mary Lopez, Milwaukee Public Library

Yvette Garcia, Chicago Public Library

 

Learn how staff at two urban public libraries in two different cities, Chicago and Milwaukee, transformed their library space with nearly no budget using Patron Driven Design. The Rudy Lozano Library of the Chicago Public Library and the Atkinson Branch of the Milwaukee Public Library used Patron Driven Design to help enhance the patron experience. The speakers will talk about how they evaluated their library space and how patrons used it and used Patron Centered Design ideas of evaluating their library space from the patron point of view and how you can use Patron Centered Design.

 

 

 

Labeling Ourselves: Self-reflections in leading and advocating for inclusive Hispanic/Latinx terminologies while also identifying as members of the Hispanic/Latinx Diaspora

Tarpon Key Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

Speakers:

Aidy Weeks, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Rebecca Orozco, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Ruby Nugent, National Jewish Health

Stephanie Roth, Temple University

 

Co-leaders of the Hispanic/Latinx Inclusive Terminologies Project briefly discuss the year-long effort undertaken to review and assess existing biomedical controlled vocabulary known as medical subject headings (MeSH) and construct a functional search hedge to better locate research specific to Hispanic/Latinx populations. Using Jessica Tao’s Cultural Humility Framework and Feminist Standpoint Theory, the panel discusses their experiences with undertaking this work and reflect on lessons learned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Re-imagining Leadership, and the challenges BIPOC leaders face when entering spaces that are not inclusive and have remained predominantly white.

Citrus Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Roundtable)

Speakers:

Chantel Walker, Marin County Free Library

Derek Wolfgram, Redwood City Public Library

James Davis, Denver Public Library/BCALA

Patty Wong ,Santa Clara City Library

 

There are challenges when BIPOC leaders enter spaces that have historically been white spaces. As leaders of color, we navigate around spaces that have not been traditionally created for us, having to deal with a series of roles and competing forces that act upon us as leaders. Join in a panel discussion as we share tools and tips needed to navigate the spaces we are currently in and the ones we may enter into as we level up in our careers. Come and hear from directors and branch managers as we discuss ways and ideas of creating more inclusive work environments among Leadership.

 

 

 

Centering EDI in Academic Librarian Recruitment: Visualizing Areas for Improvement and Change

Sawyer Key Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Carolina Hernandez, University of Houston

Erica Lopez, University of Houston

 

In this session, we will present a visualization of the recruitment process from beginning to end and identify the specific areas where inequities are often introduced and could be avoided. We will pinpoint inequitable practices at each stage and outline how more inclusive practices can be incorporated. We hope that our presentation will validate some of the frustrations experienced by job seekers in academic librarianship.

 

 

 

Listening to the Latinx Community–Lessons Learned and Recommendations

Long Key Room

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers:

Emily Sedgwick, National Center for Families Learning–NCFL

Mary Hirsh, Public Library Association

 

The Public Library Association (PLA), the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL), and Arapahoe County (CO) Libraries, with funding from an IMLS planning grant, partnered to examine barriers Latinx families face to engaging in library programs and services. Join us to discuss the partners approach, lessons learned, and how the information gathered will inform future activities in Arapahoe, and how you might apply these lessons in your library.

 

 

 

 

 

Loving Ourselves: Defining and healing from internalized oppression as library workers

Palm Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Workshop)

Speakers:

Alanna Aiko Moore, UC San Diego

Nisha Mody, Nisha Creative LLC

 

Internalized oppression is when targeted groups believe the stereotypes & misinformation communicated to them. These lies can become part of our self-image & create self-doubt, & depression, lead to imposter syndrome, & feeling disconnected from our own cultures. This session will define internalized oppression, identify the ways it manifests, & focus on healing from the damage. The BIPOC only workshop will create a space of collective sharing where attendees will build community with each other, & embrace their many identities and the beauty that arises from loving ourselves & one another.

 

 

 

Radical practices of love and healing: Unmasking and undoing the personal, professional, and intersectional interstices of whiteness in higher education

Bird Key Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers:

Teresa Neely, University of New Mexico

Jorge López-McKnight Austin Community College

Isabel Espinal, University of Massachusetts Amherst

LaKeshia Darden, Palm Beach Atlantic University

nicholae cline, Indiana University at Bloomington

 

Panelists address whiteness as a social structure in higher education, academic libraries, and identity politics. By troubling the very grounds on which the university and library stand, calling out their ongoing relationship to coloniality, they guide us towards an otherwise horizon, sketching and envisioning another world that is emerging. They offer hope, love, and homeplace to the fractured racialized landscape of higher education with radical narratives of love and healing to obstruct and decenter whiteness in academic libraries, and across college campuses in the US.

 

 

 

 

Finding our way together: A report on the experiences of BIPOC library workers in Arizona

Jasmine Room
Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Jessica  Salow, Arizona State University Library

Stacey  Akahoshi, Maricopa County Library District

catherine  lockmiller, Northern Arizona University

Berlin  Loa, University of Arizona

 

In this paper presentation, we will describe the process by which concerned members of the Arizona Library Association, alongside alongside groups who engage and educate future library workers from the University of Arizona, developed, conducted, and analyzed a survey focusing on the experiences of Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) library workers in Arizona. The presentation will provide a brief explainer of the survey’s origins and a more in-depth analysis of the data collected. We will conclude with a call for collaboration among other state library orgs and member collectives.

 

 

 

Getting Onboard with Onboarding: Reflections from Librarians of Color

Sawgrass Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Symphony Bruce, New York University

April Hathcock, New York University Libraries

Sam Mandani, New York University

Shawnta Smith-Cruz, New York University

Anastasia Chiu New York University

 

In this session, we will detail our onboarding experiences at a large academic library and consider how to build a safe(r) workplace for BIPOC workers to thrive with us. We will cover onboarding at different points of the pandemic, with different working backgrounds, and as managers as well as new employees. We will also cover our work on organizational onboarding, informed by what led us to choose a new organization, logistics for moving to a new area and starting at a new organization, navigating COVID and work hybridity, and navigating faculty life at a predominantly white institution.

 
 

Concurrent Sessions 8: Saturday, October 8th – 2:00 – 3:15PM

Equal Justice Initiatives and Public Library Partnerships

Tarpon Key Room 

Track: Advocacy, Outreach, and Collaboration (Panel)

Speakers:

Emma Buchman, March On Maryland

Rose Dawson, Alexandria Library

Skip Auld, Anne Arundel County Public Library

Monica Lindsey, Connecting the Dots Anne Arundel County

 

The Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) was established by attorney Bryan Stevenson in Montgomery, AL, as a Lynching Memorial for Peace and Justice. The EJI Lynching in America documents more than 4000 racial terror lynchings of African Americans between Reconstruction and World War II. Taking this national equity issue to the local level, come hear a panel discussion of how the Anne Arundel County Public Library, Maryland Lynching Memorial Project and Connecting the Dots Anne Arundel County memorialized the life of King Johnson who was lynched in 1911 on the grounds of a current library branch.

 

 



Filling University Archival Gaps: The Inclusive History and Images Project at Loyola Marymount University

Banyan Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Lizeth Zepeda, Loyola Marymount University

 

This presentation will focus on the Inclusive History and Images Project (IHIP) at Loyola Marymount University (LMU). The main focus of this project is to center and document the often overlooked and erased stories involving Black, Latino/a and Latinx, Asian American and Pacific Islander, Indigenous, LGBTQ+, persons with disabilities, and other members of the LMU community. This campus community call to action was created as an anti-racist initiative to give a holistic story of the campus. This presentation will focus on campus involvement, the workflows, and a critical lens of the next steps.




Hands back hands forward: Indigenous relationality, collection development, and patron representation
Banyan Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:Karleen Delaurier-Lyle, X̱wi7x̱wa Library (UBC Library)

 

This session will discuss how X̱wi7x̱wa Library’s collection development policy guides decision making processes to balance patron representation with space limitations and in the context of an inherited collection containing problematic texts. It will cover Critical Indigenous Literacy kits as an example of how to mediate problematic texts from an inherited collection. And propose research guides as a discovery tool for Two-Spirit & Indigiqueer identities within the collection.




San Diego State University Library Diversity Council: Our Commitment to DEI

Banyan Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:

Greta Heng, San Diego State University

Ashley Wilson, San Diego State University

 

Forged in 2021, San Diego State University Library Diversity Council (DVC) is a group of librarians and staff aiming to guide and hold the Library accountable in the integration of DEI into all aspects of the work. This presentation will give an overview of the DEI efforts of DVC and highlight the programs and models that DVC have successfully launched in supporting a more diverse collections, inclusive programs, and equitable services. It will also discuss our challenges and plans to better serve the global campus community.




What Should Publishers Do to Better Support Librarians and Patrons of Color?

Sawyer Key Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel)

Speakers:

Camille Gamboa, SAGE Publishing

Brittani Sterling, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Rhonda Contreras, SAGE Publishing

 

In early 2022, publishing representatives met with three groups of academic librarians of color to hold candid conversations about how they can better serve librarians and patrons eg.: -How can publishers use inclusive communication to create safe spaces for librarians and patrons? -How can publishers help librarians trying to find resources authored by historically excluded groups and on topics that support their constituent communities? Presenters will summarize what they learned and hold a final discussion to bring out new ways they can promote more inclusive scholarly communications.




Mentoring the Next Generation of Librarians of Color: Two Separate Programs, One Unifying Mission

Long Key Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Min Tong, University of Central Florida

Buenaventura (Ven)  Basco, University of Central Florida

Helen Lee, Cambridge Public Library

Hans Ongsansoy, Small Business Accelerator, UBC Library

 

This panel session features two pairs of mentors and mentees from two different ethnic affiliates with mentoring programs. The panelists, librarians at different career stages, will share how they built strong mentorship relationships through exchange of ideas and encouragement of both personal and professional growth. The experiences shared demonstrate the value of mentorship programs in attracting and retaining talents in the librarian profession, especially within the community of librarians of color, showcasing how mentees can draw from the success stories of mentors who look like them.




 

BIPOC Memory Keepers, Solidarity & Collective Power

Bird Key Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Panel) 

Speakers:

Nancy  Godoy Arizona State University Library

Alex  Soto Arizona State University Library, Labriola National American Indian Data 

Center

Jessica  Salow Arizona State University Library

Lourdes  Pereira Arizona State University Library, Labriola National American Indian Data 

Center

 

ASU Library’s Community-Driven Archives Initiative and Labriola National American Indian Data Center is actively confronting inequities and erasure in Arizona by empowering Black, Indigenous, and People of Color and Queer communities. We promote life-long learning, create safe spaces that encourage community healing, acknowledge historical trauma, and center the knowledge of traditional memory keepers. This panel will share our lived experiences as BIPOC employees in an academic library and how we decolonize archives by promoting BIPOC solidarity, justice, sovereignty and cultural resiliency.




Librarianship Across Borders: Collaborating for Student Success

Citrus Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Roundtable) 

Speakers:
Juanita Thacker, Jackson Library

Jaena Rae Cabrera, San Francisco Public Library

Amy Phillips, Library of Congress

 

Librarianship has long touted collaboration as essential to the field. Yet, we rarely see joint efforts between public and academic libraries to investigate and improve student outcomes. What is at the root of this disconnect? What unmined collaborative opportunities are being left on the table unexplored that extend beyond reciprocal borrowing agreements? The team at WOC+Lib wants to bring the two communities together to discuss potential outreach, innovative partnerships, and strategic approaches to foster student success.

 

Diversity Audit Process and Outcomes: Reflections on Project Implementation in a Regional Public Library System

Glades Room 

Track: Bridge Building, Intersectionality, and Inclusion (Roundtable)

Speakers: Danilo Baylen University of West Georgia

 

The paper presentation reports on the process of conducting a diversity audit project based on the 2020 purchase and acquisition of an electronic resources collection by a regional public library system. A diversity audit could help staff and administrators understand how the library collection aligns with the interest and needs of the user demographics and backgrounds. The report also describes and discusses the outcomes of the audit. Finally, the presentation reflects on the issues, challenges, and lessons learned from the diversity audit experience.



Change Management Team Building

Jasmine Room 

Track:Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers:Nikhat Ghouse, American University

 

As we continue to manage our work through the COVID-19 pandemic and the pandemic of racial inequality, we must also intentionally manage the return to work; working together in one place could be different together, in-person. There lies an opportunity for management and leadership to rebuild departments, teams, or organizations. To change and manage culture with inclusion and equity in active practice. It is easy to fall back into doing things from the perspective of the dominant culture group, so the act of inclusion and, therefore, culture change must begin with management and leadership.




Learn to Identify Toxic Relationships, Read the Room, and Rise Above the Chaos!

Jasmine Room 

Track:Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: Lynn Catalano, Lynn Catalano Speaks

 

Relationships are the cornerstone to improving business and building your network. Learning how to read the room is key to building better relationships. If you can quickly read the room, you will improve your chances of success in any environment! The differences between high emotional intelligence and narcissism can be destructive to your organization if you are not aware. What are the characteristics of a toxic individual? How do we cope with them? More than ever before, everyone needs to know how to co-exist with difficult people.



Moving Forward Together: CALA’s Actions Towards EDI

Jasmine Room 

Track:Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: 

Hong Yao, Queens Public Library

Wenli Gao, University of Houston

Michael Huang, Stony Brook University Health Sciences Library

Grace Liu, University of Windsor Leddy Library

 

Raising awareness, understanding biases around us is only the first step in fighting systematic racism that is rooted deep in society and in the library professional field. Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) recognizes that the success of all EDI education comes from the next steps: our actions to dismantle racism at members’ institutions, whether they are public, academic, special libraries or library schools. Our members have responded to our calls. For this presentation, we will introduce you to the programs that help advance our EDI movement to the next level.



The Art and Science of Having Difficult Workplace Conversations: Applying a DEI Lens

Jasmine Room 

Track:Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Individual Paper/Presentation)

Speakers: 

Leo Lo, The University of New Mexico

Adriana Gonzalez, University of Arkansas

 

It is almost unavoidable to have difficult workplace conversations in one’s career. These conversations are even more complex when we factor in the social, ethnic, and gender identities of the people involved. This presentation will use current research as a starting point to discuss the approach to having difficult conversations, from both the initiator’s and receiver’s perspectives. The presenters will then share personal experiences as BIPOC leaders on applying a DEI lens, such as bringing a heightened sense of awareness and sensitivity, to achieve successful outcomes.



Social Injustice, Parenting, and a Surviving a Pandemic: BIPOC Women Juggling Caregiving, Racial Trauma and COVID-19 in Librarianship.

Palm Room 

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Panel)

Speakers:

Alanna Aiko Moore, UC San Diego

Michelle McKinney, University of Cincinnati-Blue Ash

 

Over the course of the pandemic, BIPOC women have balanced working from home or front-line jobs with childcare and virtual schooling, while dealing with heightened racial trauma and violence. Despite being a female dominated profession, library institutions have expected additional work without acknowledging the additional responsibilities BIPOC women shoulder, including engaging in unpaid labor towards diversity initiatives. In this session, BIPOC caregivers will discuss parenting, race, labor, work environments, social justice and racial trauma.



Black History Month Programming in Public Libraries: Implications for EDI

Sabal Room 

Track: Collections, Programs, and Services (Panel)

Speakers:

Deborah Robinson, University of Michigan/Program for Research on Black Americans

Grace Jackson-Brown, Missouri State University

Shauntee Burns-Simpson, New York Public Library

 

BCALA received an IMLS grant to conduct a comprehensive literature review of Black History Month (BHM) programming in public libraries, develop a BHM Taxonomy, and prepare for a more extensive national study. Given the current racial climate in the United States, it is essential to see how BHM programming can be used creatively to address libraries’ commitment to EDI. The panel will provide an overview of historical and current BHM programming, present the BHM Taxonomy, have attendees evaluate their own programming, provide input to the national study, and discuss EDI implications.

 

Applying the ALA Committee On Diversity DEI Scorecard, A Dive into Equitable Promotions and Administrator Accountability

Sawgrass Room 11

Track: Leadership, Management, and Organizational Development (Workshop)

Speakers:

Natisha Harper, Howard University

 

The Diversity Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Scorecard is a rubric for equitable pathways to promotion meant to increase the number of administrators of color across libraries. Designed in 2021, by members of the ALA Committee On Diversity, the Scorecard applies best practices to the areas of hiring, retention, and promotion. Though DEI is central to most areas of the library, it is excluded from hiring and promotions processes. Apply this rubric for transparency in evaluations, consistent expectations for incremental increases, and assessment and statistics that hold administrators accountable.